Can You Survive a Network Security Attack

Businesses are under constant attack from a variety of network security threats.  Cybercriminals hack databases for passwords for unauthorized access to your network.  Undetected Malicious software (malware) can trap and forward passwords. Viruses can infect your hard drive and destroy application data and files without your knowledge. Businesses large and small face these network security threats on a daily basis; larger organizations, however, may have more resources to fight attacks.  Small businesses may be more vulnerable to downtime and loss of productivity because of thinner margins and resources. Here are a few steps you can take to survive a network security attack. Prevent Network Security Attacks Before they Occur Protect your network by making sure all devices are in compliance with the latest anti-virus and malware updates. Ensure your operating system (O/S) patches are up to date. Protect your network with strong passwords and require your employees to change them regularly.  Discourage writing passwords down, and make sure employees are aware of the risks of a network security attack. Lock Down your Mobile Devices Mobile devices including smartphones and tablets are particularly vulnerable to theft and loss. Passwords on these devices can be easily cracked leaving your applications and data vulnerable to unauthorized access. Train your employees to report theft or loss of mobile devices quickly, and make sure that all data on the device is encrypted.  Having the ability to track and wipe data from these devices is another option to ensure you can survive a network security threat. Backup Your Data Online Backup and Cloud Backup are affordable options to have quick access to applications and data...

Mobile Security: Does Your SmartPhone need a Kill Switch?

Many Smartphones and Tablet computers have access to corporate applications and their data through Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) policies and corporate-sponsored mobility strategies.  Mobile Security has become a popular topic for good reason.  According to CIO Insights, mobile data traffic is expected to increase eleven-fold by 2018. Because of increasing data traffic on mobile devices, some government agencies are looking at legislation to require manufacturers to add a smartphone kill switch to remotely wipe a mobile device if it is lost or stolen. Keeping in mind that a four-digit iPhone passcode could be hacked in minutes, this begs the question: Does your Smartphone Need a Kill Switch? Having a smartphone Kill Switch may give a sense of false security.  Adding a kill switch to protect your privacy and corporate information is reactive, rather than proactive.  If not done properly, you could wipe your employees’ irreplaceable information, such as family photos.  A Kill Switch may also make the phone entirely unrecoverable.  This means you will surely need to replace the device once the remote kill switch is invoked. Proactive Mobile Security Before you hit the Kill Switch consider proactive mobile-security measures. Smartphones and Tablets are great innovations that allow your employees to stay in touch and work anywhere.  Access to email, operational data, financial information, and customer information through a mobile device can empower your employees and increase their productivity.  Access to this information should be password-protected at all times.  Additionally, any corporate data should be encrypted in transit and at rest. Only approved applications should be allowed on the mobile device and personal data should be stored in...

Will Smartphones and Tablets Kill the PC?

With Windows XP support ending soon for millions of PCs, many companies are considering a variety of replacement strategies.  The adoption of smartphones and tablets is clearly on the rise.  According to IDC, PC shipments are expected to decline by 6% in 2014, and that trend is expected to continue.  Meanwhile, shipments of tablets surpassed shipments of PCs in 2013 and are expected to outpace shipments of PCs by 2015.  Does this mean death to the PC?  Likely not, here is why… The Case for Smartphones and Tablets The portable form factor of smartphones and tablets allows users to access corporate applications and their data at home, while traveling, and out in the field.  Because of the touch-screen interface, they are operated easily without the need for a keyboard or mouse.  This makes smartphones and tablets ideal applications for employees who are standing or travelling without access to a desk.  Because these devices typically connect via WiFi cellular network and run on battery power, they don’t have the wires, cables, and plugs associated with a PC.  Tablets and smartphones find their way on retail counters that may have limited workspace. They may also be easier to clean when they may be exposed to biohazardous materials, dust, or dirt. Smartphones and Tablets vs. the PC If you require a large monitor to view spreadsheets, create powerpoints, or edit documents, a PC may be right for you.  While many touchscreen smartphones, tablets, and convertible PCs connect with a keyboard by using a variety of interfaces, such as bluetooth, there are clear design tradeoffs for office productivity and mobile productivity.  PCs and...

Why You Need a Bullet Proof Computer Network

Your Computer Network is the information pipeline of your business. But what if your network goes down?  If your computer network is not operating properly, you may lose access to critical applications and their data.  If you are using mobile applications, software as a service, or other types of Cloud Computing, your computer network needs to be highly reliable and readily available. While reading this article, you will learn about information technology trends that impact your Computer Network. Cloud Computing and Your Network With Cloud Computing, your employees require consistent and reliable bandwidth over the internet to connect with the most popular cloud applications.  As Cloud Computing is becoming more important in business, it is becoming increasingly necessary to protect your network. Cloud Computing is an undeniable trend.  Most industry analysts forecast strong growth for The Cloud.  From a September 2013 forecast from International Data Corp., worldwide spending on public IT cloud services is predicted to reach $107 billion by 2017, an increase from $47.4 billion in 2013.   This trend in cloud computing is driving mega deals, such as the acquisition of Time Warner Cable by Comcast, as cable is a popular option for business class internet. Is your Computer Network ready for Mobile? A WiFi network is a practical way to connect laptops, convertibles, tablet PCs, and smartphones to your business.  However, mobile devices can tax your computer network performance and security.  To ensure smooth and consistent network connectivity, your computer network needs to accommodate the additional bandwidth requirements of those mobile devices.  Additionally, mobile devices may be a source of virus, Malware, or phishing schemes on your...

Mobile Security: Why Should I Care?

Mobile security is top of mind when it comes to concerns for IT Managers.  According to the Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA) risk of loss is the number one concern related to Mobile security. For the first time last year, more smart phones and tablets shipped than PC desktops.   It is no surprise that mobile devices are the target of mobile security threats. Chances are most people in your company have a smartphone, tablet or both.  In some cases these devices connect to your company network using WiFi.  It is equally likely that these devices access company information via email, mobile applications or file synch to company data.  Now that these devices are universal, it is important to have a plan if they are lost or stolen. Keep in mind, your four digit password may be the only thing between an intruder and your data.  Here are some additional considerations for mobile security. Mobile Security Policy While you can remotely wipe a Mobile devices when it is lost or stolen, this may not be enough.  That four digit passcode can be easily hacked in minutes.  It is important that employees know how to report a lost or stolen device immediately.  Also consider, there may be personal information on the device that is property of your employee.  This data may not be backed up and could be impossible to recover. There may be local laws that prevent you from wiping this type of data from personal devices.  If your employees access your corporate systems, be sure they sign and acknowledge your company policy for acceptable use, including policy for reporting...
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